Last edited by Juzilkree
Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

3 edition of A study of the values of pet owners and nonowners found in the catalog.

A study of the values of pet owners and nonowners

Phyllis C. Muller

A study of the values of pet owners and nonowners

by Phyllis C. Muller

  • 339 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Phyllis C. Muller.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 85/4069 (B)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationxi, 89 leaves.
Number of Pages89
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2690577M
LC Control Number85892061

  According to the ACAC () the Australian pet owners spent AUD 6, million on their pets in The largest part of these expenses with % are veterinary services, % are expenses on pet food, % are petcare services, % pet purchases and % petcare products.   The first report, in a recognized medical journal, indicating that animal ownership may have actual therapeutic value came nearly two decades ago. Pet owners experienced increased 1-year survival after discharge from a coro- nary care unit than nonowners (Friedmann et al., ). The effect was small but statistically and medically significant.

While dog owners ascribe different emotions to their pets, including jealousy, research on secondary emotions in nonhuman animals is very limited and, so far, only one study has investigated jealousy in dogs (Canis familiaris). This work explores jealousy in dogs one step further. We conducted two s .   A December study in The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that pet owners had greater self-esteem, were less lonely and tended to be less fearful than people without pets. And another study reported that pets eased depression and agitation and improved nutritional well-being among nursing home patients with dementia and.

How To Be A Responsible Pet Owner. How to be a responsible dog owner There is a lot of time and dedication that goes into being a responsible pet this case the pet is “man’s best friend”. Dogs are the loyalist pets to own. However they require a very large amount of attention and love. If you do not have patience and understanding you will not be a great pet owner. The results of this study will help manufacturers and all who participate in the veterinary and pet supply industries better understand the evolution and convergence of pet owner life stages and lifestyles. The study will address how pet owners and the pet population could change, how to best communicate with these groups in the future as well.


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A study of the values of pet owners and nonowners by Phyllis C. Muller Download PDF EPUB FB2

In this study, 82 pet owners and 48 non-owners were tested on self-esteem, extraversion, neuroticism, and social self-esteem. Special emphasis was placed on highly attached pet owners compared with non-owners.

Level of attachment was determined by scores from the CENSHARE pet Cited by: This study examines how pet and non-pet owners differ across a variety of socio-demographic and health measures, which has implications for the proper interpretation of a large number of correlational studies that attempt to draw causal attributions.

We use a large, population-based survey from California administered in (n = 42,) and Cited by: AMONG DIFFERENT TYPES OF PET OWNERS AND NON-OWNERS by Shannon M.

Merrill Research examining potential differences between pet owners and non-owners is prevalent in the scientific literature, but findings have often been inconsistent.

Although some researchers have incorporated animal preference into their investigations of pet. that pet owners and non-pet owners differ across many traits, including gender, age, race/ ethnicity, living arrangements, and income.

We include a discussion about how the factors associated with the selection into the pet ownership group are related to a range of mental and physical health outcomes. findings that pet owners in general fare better than nonowners (Study 1) and that owners benefit especially well when their pets fulfill social needs more effectively (Study 2).

Pet owner characteristics such as age, gender, income/social class, marital status, rural/urban residence and household type have been shown to be associated with the number of owned pets.

The research on determinants of health taken together with research examining differences between pet owners and non owners suggests that some of the health differences observed between pet owners and non owners could be over- or underestimated due to differences in socio-demographic variables such as age, race, gender, employment, income, and housing, and not necessarily (or solely) differences in pet ownership patterns.

Pet Ownership and Hyperlipidemia. There are minimal data on the association of pet ownership and lipid levels. In a study of participants attending a free screening clinic, male (but not female) dog owners had significantly but clinically modestly lower total cholesterol ( versus mg/dL; P=) and triglyceride ( versus mg/dL; P=) levels than nonowners of dogs.

12 In a. To study differences between pet owners and non-owners, the researchers turned to a huge data set - the ongoing California Health Interview Survey. Begun init is the nation’s largest. Previous findings have linked pet ownership "to decreased pain transmission" and found that the benefits pet ownership can especially be especially pronounced in people older than This study also found that pet owners experienced greater physical fitness and exercise, perhaps because they are walking their dogs.

A UK birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), were used to collect pet ownership data from the mothers, from gestation to child age 10 years old. 14, children were included in the study, of which mothers of 13, reported pet.

After a year of follow-up, pet owners were more likely to survive than non–pet owners (94% versus 71%). 14 A replication study conducted on postmyocardial infarction patients showed that dog ownership (in 86 patients [%]) was associated with better survival (P=).

15 In the latter study, adjustment was made for severity of disease. Cameron and Mattson's study of Americans across regional units reported that pet owners tended to find religion of less value than nonowners. This could be due to the fact that churchgoers tend to be higher on extroversion (Lim ) and the ownership of particular pets is linked with introversion and neuroticism (Gossling, Sandy, and Potter.

Responses to a questionnaire were used to evaluate the attitudes of pet owners and nonowners toward factors comprising responsible pet ownership. The median age of the respondents was 33 years; (45 percent) were men, and (55 percent) were women. At the time of the study, 18 percent owned a cat and a dog, 35 percent owned only a dog.

() found that elderly retirees experienced greater survival when given pet birds. The oft-cited study of coronary patients examined at one-year follow-up found a better survival rate in pet owners as compared to nonowners (Friedmann et al.

Several other studies of the bereaved have found evidence of an association of pet ownership or pet. Mild exercise in metabolic equivalents (MET-hours) was significantly higher in pet owners than non-owners (median (IQR to ) vs (IQR to ), p = ), and in dog owners than other pets (median (IQR to ) vs (IQR to ), p.

Owning a pet increases your chances of being happy and successful, according to a study. Experts who polled 1, dog and cat owners over the age of. In a study of subset data from their study, RMSSD in HRV was significantly greater in pet owners than in nonowners among patients with old myocardial infarction.

17 In the present study, the pet owners had significantly greater percentage of RR intervals that differed from each other by >50 ms and RMSSD than nonowners, consistent with the. Pet owners: adults aged 18+ who own a cat or dog, but may also own other animals; Pet non-owners: adults aged 18+ who don’t own any animals; Exclusive cat owner: adults aged 18+ who own at least one cat, and do not have pets of other species; Exclusive dog owner: adults aged 18+ who own at least one dog, and do not have pets of other species.

Research examining potential differences between pet owners and non-owners is prevalent in the scientific literature, but findings have often been inconsistent. Although some researchers have incorporated animal preference into their investigations of pet ownership, such research is scarce and inconclusive.

The purpose of this study was to examine individual differences that may systematically. Researchers at Michigan State University found that dog owners are 34 percent more likely to fit in minutes of walking per week than non-dog owners.

The study also found that owning a dog promotes health and fitness even after you take your pup for a stroll, increasing leisure-time.

"We observed evidence that pet owners fared better, both in terms of well-being outcomes and individual differences, than nonowners on several dimensions,” study. The Mayo Clinic published a new study that found people with pets—dog owners in particular—are more likely to have better cardiovascular health than non-pet owners.