Last edited by Grogal
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

3 edition of Plantation Forestry in Tropical Countries - Physical and Biological Potentials and Risks (Rural Development Studies, No. 8) found in the catalog.

Plantation Forestry in Tropical Countries - Physical and Biological Potentials and Risks (Rural Development Studies, No. 8)

Bjorn Lundgren

Plantation Forestry in Tropical Countries - Physical and Biological Potentials and Risks (Rural Development Studies, No. 8)

by Bjorn Lundgren

  • 391 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Swedish University of Agricultural Svc .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Science - Nature & Ecology

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages134
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12854652M
    ISBN 109157607133

    At the α scale, the mean species richness in Pinus plantations is (cf. Table 1 and Fig. 2), with a minimum of only 4 general, younger plantations with a more open canopy host more species than older plantations do. Within the Nothofagus forests, the mean species richness is and thus significantly higher. Within the Acacia scrublands, a mean species richness of is by:   Research identifies alternative uses for fly ash from pulp and paper mills 4 June, CSIR researchers have found that fly ash, a by-product of the South African pulp and paper industry, can be used as a supplementary cementitious material in the production of cement concrete.

      In some countries, plantations account for a large proportion of forest area. For example, 12% of the land cover in the UK consists of forest, with 68% of the forest area being plantation, while in Japan, 68% of the land area is covered by forest, with 42% of that being plantation 8. Plantation forests, typically consisting of one or a few tree Cited by: An overview of the silvicultural, social, and ecological aspects of plantation forestry in the tropics is presented, drawing examples from industrial plantations, rural development plantings, and tree planting for rehabilitation of degraded forests in Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the Pacific. The key role tree planting now plays in natural resource management and rural livelihoods Cited by:

    NZIER report – Plantation forestry statistics ii links to other industries (e.g. transport), the impact it has on rural and urban centres and the environment • $ billion 2 in plantation forestry production value was produced by growing and logging trees nationally in − $ million went on wages and salaries. Natural Forest Management and Conservation of Biodiversity in Tropical Forests KAMALJIT S. BAWA* AND REINMAR SEIDLER Biology Department, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Morrissey Boulevard, Boston, MA , U.S.A. Abstract: As a reaction to the continued dwindling of tropical forest resources, many research and develop-.


Share this book
You might also like
On the sources of the Nonne prestes tale.

On the sources of the Nonne prestes tale.

Camping, caravanning and sports equipment trades directory.

Camping, caravanning and sports equipment trades directory.

Devonshire hunting tapestries

Devonshire hunting tapestries

pageant of Greece

pageant of Greece

nonpareil speller

nonpareil speller

Common area maintenance (CAM) administration

Common area maintenance (CAM) administration

Pharmacological and chemical synonyms

Pharmacological and chemical synonyms

story of the shire

story of the shire

Liberty, Virtue, and Progress

Liberty, Virtue, and Progress

The agony of masculinity

The agony of masculinity

Tabernacle

Tabernacle

Plantation Forestry in Tropical Countries - Physical and Biological Potentials and Risks (Rural Development Studies, No. 8) by Bjorn Lundgren Download PDF EPUB FB2

Tree-planting and plantation forestry in tropical countries are expanding rapidly. Social and community forestry, tree planting to control soil erosion, and the use of agroforestry, as well as many industrial afforestation projects, are all part of the response to tropical deforestation and are central to much rural development.

The international Tropical Forest Action Programme (TFAP. Tree-planting and plantation forestry in tropical countries are expanding rapidly. Social and community forestry, tree planting to control soil erosion, and the use of agroforestry, as well as many industrial afforestation projects, are all part of the response to tropical deforestation and are central to much rural development.

The international Tropical Forest Action Programme (TFAP Reviews: 1. Forestry `This book provides the student with a comprehensive introduction or the practitioner or development specialist with an overview of plantation forestry and tree planting in tropical countries as part of sound land use.' Rural Development Forestry Network, Newsletter 14Cited by: As the rain forests disappear, development of planted forests in tropical countries is accelerating to satisfy the ever-growing global demands for wood products as well as to improve the local environment and livelihoods of poor people.

In 24 illustrated and fully referenced chapters, this book presents both the historical context and current developments in planting trees in the tropics. A single reference text on all aspects of tropical tree plantation management.

The authors draw on their field experience from over 40 tropical and sub-tropical countries and there is an extensive bibliography of over literature citations. Plantation Forestry in the Tropics by Julian Evans, Development of planted forests in tropical and subtropical countries is accelerating to satisfy the ever-growing global demand for wood products.

Indeed, it is expected that within 20 years half of all wood fibre in the world will be sourced from plantations, of which more than half are in /5(3). Promotion of sustainable plantation forestry in subtropical and tropical countries through strategic and applied research is an important objective of CIFOR.

This project arose from discussions promoted by CIFOR among international scientists and a subsequent meeting in Bogor. The outcome from the meeting included a general project. Forest plantations in tropical countries: A powerful tool for forest management, conservation and restoration in a climate change perspective Jean Noël MARIEN New demands for plantation forestry in a climate change environment • In temperate countries, centuries of decline (agriculture, industry)File Size: 1MB.

The sustainability of plantation forestry is an issue of wide interest and concern. The evidence from industrial plantation forestry suggests that biological sustainability, in terms of wood yield, is likely to be sustainable provided good practice is maintained.

The relative benefits and costs ofFile Size: KB. Site Management and Productivity in Tropical Plantation Forests Network This project has been sponsored and managed by CIFOR since The leadership of Mr Christian Cossalter () and Dr Takeshi Toma () has made it possible to operate the project as a Size: 1MB.

This new edition has been completely revised to provide up-to-date accounts (> recent literature references are added) of silvicultural practices, rural development issues, and the wider role that tree planting now plays.

The important place of social forestry is recognized. The 22 chapters are arranged in 4 parts: Introduction (4 chapters); Land, social and economic factors, and planning Cited by: degraded lands, seems essential and inevitable in many tropical and subtropical countries (Brown et al.

), particularly those with high population densities where the available good land for agricultural crops is limited and the forest product needs are Size: KB.

Providing a brief description of plantation forestry in the tropics is complicated due the large diversity of site conditions, traditions, experiences and needs regarding tree planting. With the exception of a small number of countries of the Americas, Africa and, principally, Asia, where commercial plantations of a few species have expandingFile Size: KB.

• Limit plantation size to 50 ac or smaller • Establish a ratio of 1 ac of permanent opening per 20 ac of trees within plantations > 50 ac • Establish irregular plantation boundaries • Establish or preserve hardwood corridors and firebreaks -roads planted to herbaceous cover to increase diversityFile Size: 4MB.

The tropical fores 37–44, Japan international forestry promotion and cooperation center Google Scholar Kato T () The role of trial plantation established at Benakat, South Sumatra at seven years after termination of the project (in Japanese).Author: Shobu Sakurai.

The Journal of Tropical Forestry (JTF), the oldest forestry journal in the central India, started its publication in the year It is a publication of the Society of Tropical Forestry Scientists (STFS) Jabalpur. JTF is a quarterly Journal devoted to forestry research and development in tropical countries.

Plantation Forestry in Sub Saharan Africa: Silvicultural, Ecological Discov. Innov., ; 21(SFM Special Edition No. 1) and Economic Aspects ecological impacts of plantations, weakening public forest services as a result of diminishing priority given to them in the face of economic reforms such.

plantation forests and their long-term sus-tainability; as a criterion for SFM, it is be-coming clear that maintenance of biological diversity has direct implications for planta-tion forests and their management.

Biodiversity in a forest ecosystem is de-Journal of Forestry • March 65 ABSTRACT forest ecologyCited by: Plantation forests, climate change and biodiversity forest managers worldwide are already considering new approaches to plantation forestry in an effort to create forests that are more resilient to the effects of changing climatic conditions.

Such change presents significant risks to existing biodiversity values in plantation forests Cited by: Bernhard-Reversat, F. (Editor) Effect of exotic tree plantations on plant diversity and biological soil fertility in the Congo savanna: with special reference to eucalypts.

Center for International Forestry Research, Bogor, Indonesia, 71p. Published by Center for International Forestry Research. Tropical forestry handbook, Second edition Fifteen tropical countries loose more than 1 % of their forests per year, in five countries forest area is stable, and in nine countries forest area.Pandey, D.

Assessment of tropical forest plantation resources. Department of Forest Survey, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Unpublished report to Forestry Department, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome. Google ScholarCited by: Demands on Tropical Forests 7 Plantation Forests in the Tropics 8 The Challenge 19 2.

Genetic Resources for Plantation Forestry 25 T.J.B. Boyle, C. Cossalter and A.R. Griffin Genetic Resources in Tropical Plantation Forestry 26 Genetics and Genetic Variation 29 Tree Improvement Strategies 38 Breeding and Propagation Strategies